Xijiang Miao Villageis the largest Miao ethnic village all over the world

The Miao is an ethnic group known as keen on singing and dancing. Xijiang Miao Village is situated 37 kilometers northeast of Kaili, Guizhou Province. The village is known as the largest one in China, it is famous for profound ethnic culture, beautiful scenery and interesting tourism activities.

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Xijiang Miao Village is the largest Miao ethnic village all over the world. Anthropologists and experts on folklore consider this as the well-reserved region of ’primitive ecological environment’ of Miao Minority.
Xijiang Miao Village, also named ‘China’s Miao stockade village of one thousand households’, is supposed to be the largest Miao Village in China. A continuous row of houses spreads in line of the hilly area. These houses are unique and grand under sunshine and verdant trees.

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The village is located southeast of the town of Kaili (凯里) in southeastern Guizhou, deep in a valley. While we were driving on the narrow windy road in the middle of steep hills covered with forests. So much for the lost paradise and mysterious Miao villages hidden in the misty valley. Xijiang has become a major tourist attraction for those who want to experience the culture of the Miao.
Xijiang Miao Village celebrates many festivals, if tourists are lucky enough to get there during local festivals they could experience how magnificent it could be. Once come to Xijiang, tourists are invited to live like a Miao people, sing Miao songs, dances, wear Miao traditional costumes and silver ornaments.

Chinese New Year is the most important of the traditional Chinese holidays

  Chinese New Year is the most important of the traditional Chinese holidays. In China, it is also known as the ‘Spring Festival’, the literal translation of the modern Chinese name. Chinese New Year celebrations traditionally ran from Chinese New Year’s Day itself, the first day of the first month of the Chinese calendar, to the Lantern Festival on the 15th day of the first month. The evening preceding Chinese New Year’s Day is an occasion for Chinese families to gather for the annual reunion dinner. Because the Chinese calendar is lunisolar, the Chinese New Year is often referred to as the “Lunar New Year”. This year it falls on the 10th of February 2013 and is the year of the snake.

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  There are many legends about the festival in Chinese culture. In folk culture, the Spring Festival is There are many legends about the festival in Chinese culture. In folk culture, the Spring Festival is also called “guonian” (meaning “passing a year”). It is said that the “nian” (year) was a strong monster which was fierce and cruel and ate one kind of animal including human being a day. Human beings were scared about it and had to hide on the evening when the “nian” came out. Later, people found that “nian” was very scared about the red color and fireworks. So after that, people use red color and fireworks or firecrackers to drive away “nian” every year. As a result, the custom of using red color and setting off fireworks remains. More information about Chinese New Year in China tour chinatourguide.com.

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  Waking up on New Year, everybody dresses up. First they extend greetings to their parents. Then each child will get money as a New Year gift, wrapped up in red paper. People in northern China will eat jiaozi, or dumplings, for breakfast, as they think “jiaozi” in sound means “bidding farewell to the old and ushering in the new”. Also, the shape of the dumpling is like gold ingot from ancient China. So people eat them and wish for money and treasure.
  Southern Chinese eat niangao (New Year cake made of glutinous rice flour) on this occasion, because as a homophone, niangao means “higher and higher, one year after another.” The first five days after the Spring Festival are a good time for relatives, friends, and classmates as well as colleagues to exchange greetings, gifts and chat leisurely.

Guizhou is a hidden world with amazing natural beauty and diversified minority cultures

  Guizhou Province, located in the southeast of China, has only recently been noticed by travelers. Guizhou has a very large ethnic minority population and because not too many visitors come to the province, they have remained untouched. Their customs and traditions are intact, and offer an amazing experience for any visitor to Guizhou. On a Guizhou tour, visitors can witness how these minority groups have lived for centuries and experience the unique aspects of each minority group and be dazzled by their hospitality.

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  Relatively unknown to foreign tourists, Guizhou is a hidden world with amazing natural beauty and diversified minority cultures. For its natural beauty, the famous Huanguoshu Waterfall, fabulous Dragon Palace Cave, the beautiful Malinghe Canyon, plus the endless seas of rape-seed flowers in spring, make more than just proving samples. Moreover, Guizhou offers you an ideal place to appreciate flavored minority cultures of China which have been kept unchanged and untouched for centuries. Take a spring tour to Guizhou, you can personally see their colorful clothes, try some culinary delights and take part in their traditional festivals (Sister’s Meal Festival on April 17; Siyueba Festival on May 10), which makes a pleasant contrast to modern city life.

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  Guizhou is home to dozens of ethnic minority groups. One of the largest is the Miao ethnic minority group. Over 3,600,000 people, half of China’s Miao population live in Guizhou. With a history of over 4,000 years, the Miao are one of the oldest of China’s minority groups. The Miao minority group can be found not only in Guizhou, but also in Hainan, Hubei, Sichuan, Gansu, Guizhou, Qinghai, Hunan, Guangdong, Yunnan, and Guangxi.